Graphic design is not fine art… It’s not something that you do alone in a loft… You have partners whether you like it or not. Those partners can be your client, your coworkers, the project manager, or the account exec. I always try to treat them like partners who can help guide the project toward success and not as hindrances to my creativity. So by its nature, graphic design/New Media design is a collaborative craft, which is wonderful because it presents so many opportunities to learn. MTIV: Process, Inspiration And Practice For The New Media Designer by Hillman Curtis

Somedays I love me some good old rock! “Crazy On You” by Heart

(Source: youtube.com)

James Bridle’s writeup of his fantastic SXSW panel about the New Aesthetic: booktwo.org

James Bridle’s writeup of his fantastic SXSW panel about the New Aesthetic: booktwo.org

The Red List is an extensive collection of visual art.

The Red List is an extensive collection of visual art.

The Animals House of the Rising Sun Old School Computer Remix

(Source: youtube.com)

Kosovaren retten Schweizer Nati!

Kosovaren retten Schweizer Nati!

(Source: svpplakateverhunztexten)

seldo:

This is genuinely Microsoft’s idea of a “streamlined”, “optimized” UI for Windows Explorer. They were so proud of it they wrote a blog post about it.
The post is a sort of masterpiece of crazy rationalization, but I think my favourite part may be this screenshot:

Here, they proudly overlay the UI with data from their research into how often various commands are used. They use this to show that “the commands that make up 84% of what users do in Explorer are now in one tab”. But the more important thing is that the remaining 50% of the bar is taken up by buttons that nobody will ever use, ever, even according to Microsoft’s own research. And yet somehow they remain smack bang in the middle of the interface. The insanity is further enriched by this graph:

Again, this is Microsoft’s own research, cited in the same post: nobody — almost literally 0% of users — uses the menu bar, and only 10% of users use the command bar. Nearly everybody is using the context menu or hotkeys. So the solution, obviously, is to make both the menu bar and the command bar bigger and more prominent. Right?
Microsoft UI has officially entered the realm of self-parody.

seldo:

This is genuinely Microsoft’s idea of a “streamlined”, “optimized” UI for Windows Explorer. They were so proud of it they wrote a blog post about it.

The post is a sort of masterpiece of crazy rationalization, but I think my favourite part may be this screenshot:

Here, they proudly overlay the UI with data from their research into how often various commands are used. They use this to show that “the commands that make up 84% of what users do in Explorer are now in one tab”. But the more important thing is that the remaining 50% of the bar is taken up by buttons that nobody will ever use, ever, even according to Microsoft’s own research. And yet somehow they remain smack bang in the middle of the interface. The insanity is further enriched by this graph:

Again, this is Microsoft’s own research, cited in the same post: nobody — almost literally 0% of users — uses the menu bar, and only 10% of users use the command bar. Nearly everybody is using the context menu or hotkeys. So the solution, obviously, is to make both the menu bar and the command bar bigger and more prominent. Right?

Microsoft UI has officially entered the realm of self-parody.